FEMA Modifies Flood Hazard Determinations

Posted on April 25, 2014 By

This notice lists communities where the addition or modification of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory floodway (hereinafter referred to as flood hazard determinations), as shown on the Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs), and where applicable, in the supporting Flood Insurance Study (FIS) reports, prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for each community, is appropriate because of new scientific or technical data. The FIRM, and where applicable, portions of the FIS report, have been revised to reflect these flood hazard determinations through issuance of a Letter of Map Revision (LOMR), in accordance with Title 44, Part 65 of the Code of Federal Regulations (44 CFR Part 65). The LOMR will be used by insurance agents and others to calculate appropriate flood insurance premium rates for new buildings and the contents of those buildings.

    In 2009, Levees.org commissioned DisasterMap.net's own Dr. Ezra Boyd to analyze the data. His research found that not only does 55% of the population live within these areas, but they are wealthier and unemployment is lower in counties protected by levees. Specifically, per capita income was $1,500 greater in the counties with levees and poverty was 2% lower. They also pay more taxes. The results were published by the New Orleans Times Picayune, Homeland Security’s Newswire Service, the American Society of Civil Engineers, and the Insurance Journal. Click pic for more details.

In 2009, Levees.org commissioned DisasterMap.net’s own Dr. Ezra Boyd to analyze the data. His research found that not only does 55% of the population live within these areas, but they are wealthier and unemployment is lower in counties protected by levees. Specifically, per capita income was $1,500 greater in the counties with levees and poverty was 2% lower. They also pay more taxes. The results were published by the New Orleans Times Picayune, Homeland Security’s Newswire Service, the American Society of Civil Engineers, and the Insurance Journal. Click pic for more details.

These proposed flood hazard determinations, together with the floodplain management criteria required by 44 CFR 60.3, are the minimum that are required. They should not be construed to mean that the community must change any existing ordinances that are more stringent in their floodplain management requirements. The community may at any time enact stricter requirements of its own or pursuant to policies established by other Federal, State, or regional entities. These flood hazard determinations are used to meet the floodplain management requirements of the NFIP and also are used to calculate the appropriate flood insurance premium rates for new buildings built after the FIRM and FIS report become effective. ~Read more.

"FEMA NFHL" is a general application that provides for the display of flood hazard zones and labels, floodways, Coastal Barrier Resources System and Otherwise Protected Area units, community boundaries and names, base flood elevations, cross sections and coastal transects and their labels, hydraulic and flood control structures, flood profile baselines, coastal transect baselines, limit of moderate wave action lines, river mile markers, and Flood Insurance Rate Map and Letter of Map Revision boundaries and numbers. Additional reference layers include the status of NFHL data availability, point locations for Letters of Map Amendment (LOMAs) and Letters of Map Revision Based on Fill (LOMR–Fs). You control the information displayed by turning layers on and off. A basic knowledge of Google Earth and FEMA flood hazard information will help users of this application. The name of each layer is hyperlinked to a description of the layer, the map symbols used for the layer, and links to other FEMA web sites relevant to the layer. If a layer is turned on, clicking the text below the name of the layer (text that starts with "Draws at…") zooms the Google Earth view to a sample display of the layer. Layers are organized for display at one or more of three "eye altitude" (map scale) ranges in Google Earth: status maps at high altitudes, regional overviews of flood hazards at medium altitudes, and detailed flood hazard maps at low altitudes. Click on the hyperlinked folder name of the application to see the altitudes at which data in the layers are displayed. For best performance please delete or turn off previous versions of the "Stay Dry" or "FEMA NFHL" folders that you have loaded in Google Earth before using the new version of "FEMA NFHL." Click pic for more details.

FEMA NFHL” is a general application that provides for the display of flood hazard zones and labels, floodways, Coastal Barrier Resources System and Otherwise Protected Area units, community boundaries and names, base flood elevations, cross sections and coastal transects and their labels, hydraulic and flood control structures, flood profile baselines, coastal transect baselines, limit of moderate wave action lines, river mile markers, and Flood Insurance Rate Map and Letter of Map Revision boundaries and numbers. Additional reference layers include the status of NFHL data availability, point locations for Letters of Map Amendment (LOMAs) and Letters of Map Revision Based on Fill (LOMR–Fs). You control the information displayed by turning layers on and off. A basic knowledge of Google Earth and FEMA flood hazard information will help users of this application.

 

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