How the U.S. Is Embracing Natural Disasters ~Jenny Xie, @NextCityOrg

Posted on June 20, 2014 By

I came into this business from the experience of covering disasters in real time to help those in the thick of it gain situational awareness. Yet, most of what we do here at DisasterMap.net involves contract work for cities, counties and states in their efforts at not only mitigating but surviving their next disasters. I’ve found the folks at Next City to be on top of this issue, as they cover cities in general and their information of cultural cohesion. ~Bruce Biles

The International Hurricane Research Center in Miami, Florida, features 12, six-foot tall fans — a virtual Wall of Wind — capable of simulating Category 5 hurricanes to test the performance of structures and materials. (Photo: Wall of Wind, Florida International University)  ~Click to enlarge.

The International Hurricane Research Center in Miami, Florida, features 12, six-foot tall fans — a virtual Wall of Wind — capable of simulating Category 5 hurricanes to test the performance of structures and materials. (Photo: Wall of Wind, Florida International University)
~Click to enlarge.

“Designing for Disaster” covers a wide spectrum of U.S. disaster mitigation strategies spanning the last century, and the exhibit is organized by the natural forces posing the challenge — earth, air, fire and water. All four sections feature numerous deep-dives into impressive design and engineering solutions. In the “earth” section, for example, there’s the story of how UC Berkeley’s $320 million “seismic upgrade” for its California Memorial Stadium included staircase joints that can expand to accommodate quake movements. Over in the “air” room, an interactive hands-on version of Florida International University’s Wall of Wind reveals how simulating Category 5 hurricanes can help determine best-performing roof designs. Read more.

Disaster ResilienceNext City     , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,