U.S. lacks a national plan to save its coastal cities—and it needs one now, according to a new report @MarkKobaCNBC

Posted on July 31, 2014 By

Wow! This is such a great article, by Mark Koba, on one of my own pet peeves, to wit: Infrastructure Preparedness. Too often national news glazes over the finer details of civic infrastructure investment and its relationship to climate change. But that is simply not how Business works, thrives and survives. Business wants details, cross-referential, contextual, actionable details. “The Devil’s in the details,” is a business term.  This is why successful business models for online national news media in general are specifically Business News Outlets like CNBC or Bloomberg. It is a very competitive field due to our species’ inherent need for details. The discussion and politics surrounding Climate Change may sound like cacophony across our main stream media, but Business does not do cacophony well. From the smallest business to largest corporation, success or failure is predicated upon and built from details. And that goes for online news –win, lose or draw. ~Bruce Biles

Figure 1. Population growth along the Southeast coast and the Gulf of Mexico between 2000 and 2012 was faster than the national average growth of 11.5%. Those are the same areas where major hurricanes are most frequent. Red circles denote areas where major hurricanes return on average every 14-22 years. Population data from the National Ocean Economics Program, www.oceaneconomics.org; Return period graphics from NOAA

Figure 1, click to enlarge. Population growth along the Southeast coast and the Gulf of Mexico between 2000 and 2012 was faster than the national average growth of 11.5%. Those are the same areas where major hurricanes are most frequent. Red circles denote areas where major hurricanes return on average every 14-22 years. Population data from the National Ocean Economics Program. Return period graphics from NOAA

The report, spearheaded by the National Research Council, urges a strategy of increased cooperation among government agencies to be “proactive” for events such as hurricanes and rising sea levels. That’s as more people move into hazardous areas along the eastern seaboard and the Gulf Coast.

“The report is a warning that it’s imperative we do something on a national level,” said Rachel Cleetus, a senior climate economist with the Union of Concerned Scientists. “We just go back after a storm and build the same way as before, and we can’t keep doing that.”

The report cites how the lack of planning plays out financially. Between 2008 and 2012, $493 million was appropriated by the federal government for coastal protection efforts. However, at least $12.8 billion in emergency funding was allocated during the same time for recovery—after storms like Hurricane Sandy and Irene.

“A lot of preventative efforts just lack money,” said Marc Roy, a professor of disaster management at Tulane University in New Orleans. ‘We have to see that the benefits of long-term planning out weigh the costs.” –Read more.

Update: 93L Fighting Dry Air, But Could be a Tropical Depression

Figure 1. Latest satellite image of 93L.

Latest satellite image of 93L. Click to enlarge. Thanks to  Dr. Jeff Masters @wunderground.

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