Army Corps of Engineers embraces uncertainty in planning for climate change ~Jered Serbu, Federal News Radio

Posted on November 16, 2014 By

Leaders at the Army Corps of Engineers say the science is clear: The effects of climate change mean its vast network of civil works projects are going to have to stand up to weather events more severe than they’ve ever seen before, and those storms and droughts are going to be much harder to predict.

Fifty five percent (55%) of the U.S. population lives in counties protected by levees.  This represents 157 million people. For Levees.Org the New Orleans Ladder commissioned disaster geographer Ezra Boyd to create an interactive map using this levee data.  By clicking on the pic, you can access this free interactive map which provides details about every county in America that contains a levee(s).

Fifty five percent (55%) of the U.S. population lives in counties protected by levees. This represents 157 million people. For Levees.Org the New Orleans Ladder commissioned disaster geographer Ezra Boyd to create an interactive map using this levee data. By clicking on the pic, you can access this free interactive map which provides details about every county in America that contains a levees).

So the corps is adjusting its business model in a way that attempts to embrace climate uncertainty as a fact of life, and says its response to climate change has to be much more comprehensive than building bigger dams and higher levees. Read more.

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