Corps of Engineers boss: Poor waterway infrastructure hurts U.S. ~Austin Alonzo @KCBizJournal

Posted on December 13, 2014 By

As I’ve studied our nations waterways and levees for DisasterMap.net it’s become apparent that most of our systems were not built by the Corps of Engineers. It seems counter-intuitive at first glance. Oh, there are the obvious flood control systems, but this country has thousands of miles of civil water works built by civilians.  Thus I find it very encouraging for the head of the Corps to come out like this regarding reinvesting in our nation’s civil engineering infrastructure. This is a great article. I just followed Austin Alonzo on Twitter @aalonzoKCBJ~Bruce Biles

    In 2009, Levees.org commissioned DisasterMap.net's own Dr. Ezra Boyd to analyze the data. His research found that not only does 55% of the population live within these areas, but they are wealthier and unemployment is lower in counties protected by levees. Specifically, per capita income was $1,500 greater in the counties with levees and poverty was 2% lower. They also pay more taxes. The results were published by the New Orleans Times Picayune, Homeland Security’s Newswire Service, the American Society of Civil Engineers, and the Insurance Journal. Click pic for more details.

In 2009, Levees.org commissioned DisasterMap.net’s own Dr. Ezra Boyd to analyze the data. His research found that not only does 55% of the population live within these areas, but they are wealthier and unemployment is lower in counties protected by levees. Specifically, per capita income was $1,500 greater in the counties with levees and poverty was 2% lower. They also pay more taxes. The results were published by the New Orleans Times Picayune, Homeland Security’s Newswire Service, the American Society of Civil Engineers, and the Insurance Journal. Click pic for more details.

The nation’s waterway infrastructure is aging rapidly, and continued neglect of the nation’s river ways, levees, dams and ports will put the nation at an economic disadvantage, the chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said.

Lt. Gen. Thomas Bostick focused on the poor state of the infrastructure and the dwindling options to pay for necessary improvements during his appearance Wednesday at the Society of American Military Engineers’ Small Business Conference at Bartle Hall in Kansas City.

By 2020, Bostick said, U.S. infrastructure — including waterways as well as roads and bridges — will require about $3.6 trillion in repairs given the current rate of decline. Read more.

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