Chicago Planners Map “Crumbling Infrastructure” in Exquisite Detail ~Rachel Dovey @NextCityOrg

Posted on January 30, 2015 By

DisasterMap.net is preparing to unveil our own new interactive national webmap for Unacceptable Levees, based on the latest data from the National Levee Data Base. So stay tuned! ~Bruce Biles

A new website from the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) accomplishes this feat beautifully, turning piles of regional statistics into clean-but-sharp interactive maps. Designed in-house, the site cost around $82,000 to create, according to CMAP spokesperson Tom Garritano.

Federal regulations require the quality of bridges to be tracked closely, and for the region as a whole those evaluations make a good barometer of our commitment to maintaining the overall transportation system. This map shows the growth of bridges since 1900, and for 2013 it shows bridges that are categorized by the Federal Highway Administration’s National Bridge Inventory (NBI) as "structurally deficient" or "not deficient." Note this does not include rail or pedestrian bridges.

Federal regulations require the quality of bridges to be tracked closely, and for the region as a whole those evaluations make a good barometer of our commitment to maintaining the overall transportation system. This interactive map shows the growth of bridges since 1900, and for 2013 it shows bridges that are categorized by the Federal Highway Administration’s National Bridge Inventory (NBI) as “structurally deficient” or “not deficient.” Note this does not include rail or pedestrian bridges.

“Data rules the world, and I don’t think that’s going to end, ever,” he says, explaining the organization’s motivation. Formed in 2005, the regional planning agency was a merger of transportation and land use authorities, both of whom were “keepers” of the figures for decades. Nearly 10 years ago, technology to build a digital representation didn’t exist, but now, Garritano explains, “we want to be as transparent as we can with public data.” Read more.

InfrastructureNextCity.org     , , , , , , , ,